Max Humphrey
Piano & keyboard specialist
maxhumphreymusic

Korg XE20 Walkaround

Hi there everyone, I’m Max at ePianos, and today I’ll be giving you a walkaround of the Korg XE20. Stick around if you’re interested in the design and outlook of this keyboard, how it is put together and what some of the different features do!

Let’s start with the top surface (face) of the keyboard, going from the left… We have the logo for the keyboard that it is, being an ‘XE20 – Digital Ensemble Piano’. Then we have the ‘Power On/ Off’ button with a red light which lights up when the keyboard is on. Next to that, we have a volume wheel which has a groove in it to signify what volume it is currently on. Then we have a ‘Piano ½’ button which is used to select between the two different piano sounds on the keyboard, and a ‘Style Set’ button to change the style of backing you are playing to, and an option to have reverb on your piano too which is displayed from the ‘Reverb button’. All of these options are displayed and clarified on the screen in the middle of the keyboard.

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Video

Today, Max is giving us a really good look around the XE20 from Korg. We're covering all the angles you don't usually see when you look at the product on websites and explaining our Korg XE20 setup.

Just above this, we have the left speaker along the whole top left-hand side of the keyboard, and it is identical to the right speaker. They both are covered in a sort of foam, polyester material to make the keyboard look nice and slick, though the actual speaker underneath it doesn’t take up to much room. But this is done purely to make the keyboard look good, neat and tidy from all angles.

Speaking of looks, this keyboard has a beautiful matte black finish all the way around and is actually curved around the corners to make the instrument look even more appealing to the eye. It also has a thin, compact shape to it, from all angles, keeping to its simple yet modern look.

Moving on to the main hub of buttons in the centre of the keyboard, these buttons control the main features of the keyboard, including the excellent, ‘accompaniment’ section that the keyboard has. This is the main feature to this keyboard, meaning it acts and functions as a normal keyboard, allowing you to play the piano on it and use it for this purpose, as well as a full-band, accompaniment keyboard which allows you to play along to its 280 different styles, which are divided into 17 different groups.

In the centre hub of buttons, there is also a control wheel which allows you to scroll through the various different options, and a fairly large screen displayed in the centre, which gives you all the information you need for the keyboard. 

There is also a ‘Transpose’ button and a ‘Metronome’ button in the corner of this central hub, and as you use these buttons, the main screen will show you what you are changing, which is a great addition to the keyboard and really helps you to navigate the instrument.

Lots of the buttons in the main hub of the screen also light up in either green or red when they are pressed, to make clearer what has been selected and what hasn’t, and to help you know what controls what even better.

As already mentioned, the front and sides of this keyboard are simple and plain, holding to the keyboard’s simple yet high-quality look.

Moving onto the back of the keyboard, you have the logo on the left side, stating that the keyboard is a ‘KORG’ keyboard. You also get to admire the curved edges of the keyboard with this back view, which I must admit, looks really satisfying and certainly gives you your money’s worth. 

Then in the centre of the back part of the keyboard, we have the main section for all of the different plug-ins, inputs and outputs to the keyboard. On the very left we have some model details for the keyboard, including its serial number etc. Then we have the power supply input for the main power cable which comes as a package with the keyboard itself, this is a 9V input. Then we have the ‘Audio in’ plugin, followed by the ‘Foot Controller’ plugin, the two ‘Audio-out’ plug-ins for if you want to connect the keyboard up to separate monitors, a ‘USB to Host’ and ‘USB to Device’ input for connecting your phone or computer to the keyboard, and finally a headphone jack plug-in so you can play in silence and only have sound coming through the headphones if need be.

Moving onto the underneath of the keyboard, there isn’t too much going on, apart from lots of screws to hold the keyboard together, some more information about the keyboard, and finally, an input for the Korg sustain pedal which comes with the keyboard. The input for this being on the underneath of the keyboard, it allows for more length and move-ability to where on the floor you’d like the pedal to be placed and makes the keyboard look neater from a front-facing view.

The sustain pedal itself is slightly smaller than that of an acoustic piano or one of the deluxe pedals for the Yamaha models of keyboards. It also has its own plugin, meaning you won’t be able to choose any other pedals to go with the keyboard.

Overall, the keyboard looks great and boasts a neat and tidy look, despite all of the features this keyboard includes.

I hope you have enjoyed this ‘Walk-around’ overview of the Korg XE20 and that you have found the information I’ve included useful. I will include a link in the description for this keyboard on our website, so you can check it out. 

Whilst you are there, please make sure to subscribe to our mailing list for our weekly offers, news updates, specials and deals, you won’t want to miss out! Bye for now.

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